Tuesday, January 25, 2011

sage stands alone

roasted butternut squash with sage butter

Sage is one of the few herbs I can still harvest after several bouts of temperatures at or below zero. Oh, there's always thyme, a very small amount of parsley, and a few things in the cold frame -- but to pick enough to actually make something we love? Sage stands alone. For this meal last night, I pretty much cleaned all the leaves off one plant to get the half cup needed. And that's OK because there are several more plants for the next few months if I watch it. 

sage stands alone

Roasted Butternut Squash with Sage Butter
This is our favorite use for sage.  I don't bother with washing it unless I see something -- I figure it's going to be cooked anyway. If you do wash the sage, make sure it's completely dry before proceeding.

Peel & cut squash into 1" chunks, toss with olive oil and spread on foil-lined sheet. Season with s & p, then roast at 400 degrees for 30-40 minutes.

Toward end of cooking time, melt a stick of unsalted butter. When bubbly, add 1/2 cup of whole sage leaves and saute until the leaves start to get crinkled and the butter has browned. Drizzle over roasted squash.

 see how the leaves nearly match the spatula now?

 crispy sage leaves over squash

If you've never made this, try it! It's won-der-ful. It's probably great over all kinds of vegetables, but I keep going back to squash. I think it's a traditional topping for pumpkin-filled pastas, too, but we don't normally eat grains so no pasta around here.

10 comments:

Marie said...

I was just going through my incense and came across sage incense...which, i really enjoy.
I have a sage plant too! I brought it indoors but it is
not as hardy. It is too cold here. Below zero the last few days. Will have to try this sage dish.
I love squash <3

woman with wings said...

Marie -- do you bring in your sage every winter? That's so interesting, I've never done that. But I guess we don't need to here, it pretty much keeps going unless the weather dries it out too much, then it comes back in the spring. Hope you like the recipe!

helen said...

Sage is good for burning and dispelling bad energy. Curious why you don't eat any grains? Many grains have protein and are essentially fuel for the brain. Just curious.

woman with wings said...

I avoid grains at home but will have them when I'm a guest in someone's home. Hate to be one of those people who can't eat this or that, you know? It's a health issue for me, I feel better without them. The irony is I'm the daughter of a wheat farmer!

Marie said...

I have had sage that was growing in the yard of a home and of course I left that alone but, this year I have some in a pot so, I thought why not bring it in so it does not freeze. I am sure I will enjoy the recipe : )

Deb G said...

I love fried sage leaves. I'll need to do some soon!

woman with wings said...

Deb, your sage probably looks a lot better than here in Colorado!!

Deb G said...

Yes, it winters over very well. Also the rosemary and thyme.

juliasews@comcast.net said...

Oh, I tried the fried sage leaves on our acorn squash last night and loved it. Thanks for the idea.

woman with wings said...

You're very welcome, Julia! I could just drink it, love it so much.