Tuesday, December 21, 2010

spiritcraft

                                                                                                                      winter solstice

The Winter Solstice marks the return of light in the Northern Hemisphere; in a few days' time we'll begin to notice the change. Many traditions celebrate the symbolic connection between Nature's light and our inner light. While we need darkness to see a tiny spark of new light, this project is all about nurturing those sparks -- creativity, health, abundance, or other possibilities ready to be born --and then tending the flame.

spiritcraft: candle visioning
credit for this craft is shared with the mystery circle with whom I have cut and glued for many, many moons and then some . . .

Candle visioning is basically the same process as making a vision board, a treasure map, or an abundance collage. Use this idea as a springboard. It can be a solitary activity or a family/group undertaking. I see it as a way of retrieving new things from within at the beginning of something -- of a new season or year, a new semester, or even a new blend of people in a campus or social change group.  It can be focused on a particular hope or loaded with an assortment of wishes and possibilities. Everytime the candle is lit, we are reminded of, thereby strengthening, the possibilities it holds.                    

When my children were younger, we decorated one pillar candle with beeswax shapes and then lit it every night at dinnertime. Along that same idea, now that they're adults, I'm mulling over when and how we can candle vision together using a larger pillar candle. In the past when we've been together on New Year's Day, we've gone around the circle and made a wish for the person to the left. But I think we're never too old for a new family ritual!

items needed -- Either a pillar candle* at least 3" in diameter or a straight-sided glass cylinder (or jar) that will hold a tealight or votive, magazines, scissors, glue or mod-podge

instructions -- Quiet your mind . . . then begin to page through the magazines and cut out everything you feel drawn to. Go for words, pictures and colors that appeal to you--don't judge--you probably won't use all of it in the end anyway. When you have accumulated a small pile, begin to glue the clippings onto the candle or the glass cylinder. You will know when you're done. Apply a finish coat of mod-podge to smooth it all out. Light the candle often thoughout the coming year.

*A paper sleeve for the candle or glass cylinder allows you to work on a flat surface. Measure and cut lightweight paper (tracing paper or translucent vellum would be best for a glass cylinder so that candlelight shows through) adding a few inches for overlap, then glue the clippings onto the paper instead.

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