Monday, February 1, 2016

brigid's day household ritual



Today is Brigid's Day (or Imbolc), that familiar place on the wheel of the year where we begin to feel the first stirrings of spring. I am fortunate to celebrate this holy day within a circle of women but also have my own household tradition. I began this morning by burning some evergreen branches (from Yule) in a cauldron to symbolize letting go of the old to make way for the new. I lit a candle from the cauldron fire as I stood and watched it rise and fall and finally die out.


I carried the candle into the house and lit the candles on the Brigid altar to represent the new light of longer days as well as new beginnings. I'm trying to keep the original flame going all day long by lighting fresh candles as needed. Brigid is most well known for the following aspects: Craft, Inspiration and Poetry; Magic and Transformation; and Childbirth and Healing. This means that she may be invoked for help and guidance in those areas -- the same as we energetically connect with spiritual teachers, saints, biblical figures, plant spirits, or even archetypes. Brigid seems to be patroness of the things that interest me the most, so I feel a sense of devotion to her.


The green hand long cloth reminds me of Brigid who is both a Sun Goddess and a Moon Goddess. I see this round as a moon but that can change.


A gathering of sacred objects along with plants, seeds, sticks and feathers. This is also the time of year when seeds for future crops are blessed by Brigid so I put representative packets of my garden seeds in a clay pot.


A Brigid's Day lunch of miso soup was had -- carrots, turnips, onions, greens.

Miso Soup: In a little olive oil, saute a small turnip, a medium onion, and 2 carrots, sliced however you wish. Add 2 1/2 cups water and 2 vegetable bouillon cubes and simmer for about 15 minutes. Add 2 cups chopped greens (napa cabbage, bok choy, spinach, etc.) and remove from heat. Take out 1/2 cup of the broth and mix in a tablespoon of miso. Add this mixture back to the pot and you are done. Never boil miso. I always double this recipe but only use 3 vegetable bouillon cubes. (This is good for clearing out residual radiation and medicines from the body, and always beneficial for anyone in recovery.)


It's dark and snowy here, perfect for playing the Imbolc channel on Pandora, having a fire going in the fireplace, and finishing up one tiny nine-patch.

Blessed Be YOU, as Michelle says....and visit her site for more on Brigid's Day.


11 comments:

Jeannie said...

What a beautiful tradition. I had never heard of Brigid, but you are so right. She blesses all that I hold dear. I need to find a gathering of like minded women. Your cloth is gorgeous. Now I must make some miso soup. Thank you!

Nanette said...

I didn't realise miso was good for recovery, I just know I like it. The first time I had it my daughter gave it to me when I was visiting her in Ohio, I'd had a really bad upper respiratory infection and she bought me miso soup, as I had to be well for the birth of her 2nd baby, due any day. She was also very stern and said I'd better drink it, as it 'cost her a fortune' That was 18 years ago so maybe miso was new on the shelves and expensive. I'm off to check out the equivalent here in the southern hemisphere and your Brigid's Day link. A lovely post Peggy.

Suzanna said...

I am grateful for this post Peggy, and thank you for the recipe of the miso soup. I love your green hand long cloth, reaching out of the earth of eyes...

Ms. said...

I love your lambies...your green hand with so many tiny stitches...the soup and good advice about Miso...I burned a bit of fir too in a small pot...must be most careful of fire...love everything about your day.......blessed be again to thee.

Darlene said...

Thank you for sharing!
I love the green hand cloth reaching....

Kathy -MIQuilter said...

This is a beautiful post. I learned so much and am very inspired by it. Your green hand cloth is perfect as is your tiny nine patch.

helen (buzz) said...

A beautiful post Peggy. I love Brigit for the same reasons. I remember how happy I was when I first 'found' her. I also took down the yule greenery last night and ceremonially burned it. I've been doing this for the last few years as it felt right...is it a traditional ritual, or was it something that felt right to you too? Helen (Buzz)

Nancy said...

Aw, Peggy I remember that green hand cloth! How wonderful to share in your sacred things and your day. The little lambs caught my eye too. And the tiny 9 patch is precious. I sent the miso soup recipe off to my sister and brother-in-law, but I am thinking maybe I need some as I am sick again! May your days be filled with light my friend.

Nat Palaskas said...

I love all of your traditions Peggy. I learn a lot from reading them. Thanks for sharing them with us. That Miso soup looks delish! Perfect for winter lunch - Hugs Nat

dulcy said...

So hopeful and inspiring! Your photography and needlework are just lovely. I've already checked out the suggested blog..... thanks for passing on all the loveliness! I always feel inspired and learn something new when I visit you Peggy....

xo
dulcy

Barbara said...

Of course, this could be lots of places, dark and snowy in Feb., but I have to ask, where are you? There is much Irish heritage here in our family, and I have a St. Bridgid's cross brought to us by my husband's distant relatives from Ireland. I'm happy to learn from this post so much about her. I will add her devotions to my meditation garden, along with Mary and Buddha.