Wednesday, August 29, 2012

grapes and knitting

Last weekend I made and froze grape juice from the St. Theresa grapevines. The grapes are like little blue moons and the juice is as thick and sweet as syrup.

We've converted our children's play-set platform into an arbor -- you can see the ladder on one of the photos. And our porch swing hangs where the original swings did. We removed the slide and left the trapeze bar, but eventually a vine will probably take that over, too. This is my favorite place to be. 

The Concord grapevines grow in a different area nicely covering a chain link fence, but they're not quite ready yet, as you can see. These grapes will be made into more juice for freezing and a jar or more of peace and abundance vinegar.

I sat at the patio table this morning for my second cup. Practiced crocheting a little, then thought about what to do with this scarf I began about ten years ago using odds & ends yarn -- back when knitted scarves led a new knitting movement, remember? The problem is it has a back side plus it would need to be blocked. I remember realizing this early on, but I just wanted something, anything, to knit so kept on knowing full well it wouldn't really be a good scarf. The blocking isn't a problem but the back side sort of is on a scarf. Now I'm tempted to take it apart but it does fit nicely with minestrone knitting. Maybe I could line it? Or it could be one section of a blanket? 







13 comments:

Ms. said...

I'm off to the farmers market at Union Square in search of the concord grape harvest, wondering why I live in a third floor apartment in, supposedly, the most 'exciting' city in the country, tending a small public plaza garden for the church around the corner, when what I want is a big back yard of my own. Sometimes sour grapes can only be cured by making vinegars, compotes, and jam. If you can't own it, eat it (ha). This is a beautiful post.

liniecat said...

oooh homegrown grapes..........bliss!
Guess you could just use the knitting for a bag......? It could be the top, bottom or sides along with iether more kniited work or fabric? Nice colours in it too so a shame to not use it.
Would it felt up, is it mostly wool? : )

Nancy said...

Your posts are a peaceful respite. I am a grape addict! If I eat one, two, three...there goes the bunch! I can't stop :) Your photos are so beautiful.
Can I just say...What a ding-dang wonderful idea to repurpose the old outgrown climbing set!!! I can only imagine the memory filled joy of swinging in your garden!
Coming here is a high point in my daily life :)

Jeannie said...

Your arbor is heavenly. I have a similar spot covered with wisteria and a tomatoe vine that didn't know it was determinate. The grapes looks so delicious. I live in Napa Valley north, or so the cities want the tourists to believe. You can smell the grapes as you drive by and it is like living in a Kool Aid package. Wishing you a beautiful rest of the week under the arbor.

deanna7trees said...

oh how i miss my grape vine. planted it when i moved into this house 23 years ago and got bunches the first few years but then it gradually stopped producing and the whole vine withered away. i love the colors in your knitting. i'd cut it up into patches and make a handbag. you can just double stitch across sections and cut between the 2 rows of stitching so the knitting stays in tact.

Marie said...

Your grapes look delicious and what a lovely spot you have created to grow them. Just magical : )
Definitely use the knitting some way! It is just fabulous with all the happy colors.

Peggy said...

Michelle, thanks. Where and how you live sounds pretty wonderful to me. :)

Peggy said...

Lyn, thanks, you know, it is almost all wool -- just a little bit of froufrou in there. Hadn't thought of a bag, so thanks again!

Peggy said...

Nancy, you are so nice, thank you. Well, girlfriend, if you were here we could go sit on that swing and stuff ourselves with grapes together! :)

Peggy said...

Jeanne, love the idea of living in a Kool Aid package!! It must be just beautiful where you live. The other vine on this arbor is wisteria that's never bloomed. We keep hoping. A beautiful week to you too...under your arbor!

Peggy said...

Deanna, that's a great idea! It would be a good thing to try that on, I've never steeked anything, haven't had the courage. If you replant a grapevine, I'd recommend this St. Theresa seedless variety.

Peggy said...

Thanks, Marie -- who would've ever thought the kids' play set would come to this? ;) My little ones used to swing in trance, and now it's me, a little lower and a little slower.

Nancy said...

Well, now I've learned what 'steeking' is! had to Google that :) But I love Deanna's idea. I was also thinking of somehow adding it to a 'cloth' project. Lately I've thought a lot about mixing the 2...fiber and cloth. Of course it would help if I knew how to knit or crochet! But I have considered ways of adding 'weaving' to cloth. The weight difference is my biggest concern right now.
Jeannie~ I love your description! Napa is so beautiful. I bet all the grapes would dye (or is it 'stain'??!!) fabric so well!
Marie & Peggy~ There is so much information now about swinging and brain development...turns out babies/kids knew all along what was good for them! I wonder if any studies have been done about swinging and the aging brain!! Ha!
Peggy~ you may like to read about the Wisteria Festival they have near me every year. Here is one article that gives some of the history (you can Google for more).
http://www.sierramadrenews.net/?page_id=259
My sister had a huge Wisteria over her patio. I was on the phone with her the first time she heard the pods pop and throw themselves against the sliding glass door. Scared the daylights out of her!