Wednesday, July 6, 2016

the sacred in the ordinary


At the beginning of this turn of the wheel, I pledged to find the sacred in the ordinary. Now at Midsummer I realize that it's all right here in my own backyard...the sacred in the ordinary.


The birds love angelica seeds, I love the solitary hollyhock.


Maximilian sunflowers and St. Theresa grapes both do well here in Colorado. In case you didn't know, Maximilian sunflower roots form a thick barrier to block invading species.


I like the perfectly fringed petals of an elecampagne, Inula helenium, flower. Elecampagne roots are a source of blue dye and a respiratory medicine but I don't think I'll have the heart to dig them up for either purpose.


Looking up -- this is a pinon pine tree that we thought was a lost cause many years ago but she endures. The flicker house has been home to birds and squirrels, there is a family of blue jays hanging around it right now but I've never heard of blue jays using a birdhouse so it might just be coincidence.


The nettle patch has been sparse for some reason although this grandmother plant is over 7' tall. I decided to help the family recover by not harvesting any leaves -- look at all her seeds.


A new bee-house -- each tube can be home to a solitary bee and her offspring. About 85% of all bees are solitary bees, wonderful pollinators who often go unnoticed because of their small size.


Birth of a sunflower blossom.


The garden is vibrant and lush, a flurry of activity with butterflies and bees and when things begin to go to seed more, the birds will join in as well. Lush is not so easy to come by here in Colorado, being inlanders the landscape can dry up quickly into varying shades of brown and tan. I think we are considered to have a high desert climate based on altitude and rainfall. Alongside the Buddha garden is a patch of grass already going dormant for the hot months.


Today I made a list of most of the plants I started from seed for this growing season, leaving room for additional notes -- a minimalist version of a garden journal.


A little 3" x 4" Solstice book cloth was woven, stitched and fringed. As I sewed I thought about planting more trees, bushes and plants and which ones and where. I thought about attracting more birds and how birdsong stimulates growth and makes the trees, bushes and plants happy. And I thought about naming this space I am so lucky to tend. All of this is in the works.

Blessings of the garden to you. xxxx


15 comments:

dulcy said...

I would like to learn more about the solitary bee home. I've seen these before, but did not really understand how they are used. I love the idea of naming your space. Mine is special too, and I think it deserves a name. I'll work on that. Lovely post Peggy!
xo
dulcy

Nancy said...

Oh Peggy, Peggy, Peggy...what solace for my tired soul. I'm so grateful I came home to this tonight. Lush is indeed the word. I can't wait to hear your name choice, as I've been obsessed with names lately. The new bee house is such a curious thing. Did you get a new hive too? I can't remember. And the light in your garden is breathtaking. The list and the photographed seed packages made me think of the book The Egg and I...have you read it? As for the little Solstice Book...sigh. :)

Ms. said...

Lush and lovely, bright with promise, beautiful, beautiful, beautiful. Sweet little solstice piece too.

Nanette said...

I noticed the the beautiful blue flower around your Buddha in your last post, Peggy....what is it? Lovely post and glimpses of your garden.

Pam said...

Beautiful post - thank you! It is great to see what goes on in other climates. My own space has been particularly beautiful this time of year. I am intrigued by the bee house and will be doing some research today.

jude said...

Me too, the bee home is great

Kathy -MIQuilter said...

Your solstice book cover turned out wonderful, very meditative stitching. I name all my garden spaces, they are that important to me. Wish I had more time to spend in them.

handstories said...

Your cloth has the feel of a garden full of seeds, ready to burst, as does the energy of this whole post. & I'm fascinated by the bee home.

Peggy said...

Dulcy, yes, the solitary bee houses are popular now -- solitary bees are just that, single fertile females that lay eggs and raise their young in tiny tunnels in the ground or tubular spaces like these bamboo tubes have. I think I may have missed the boat with my timing -- too late. But next spring I expect to have a full house. Will love knowing what you name your space, something with "fox" in it, perhaps? :)

Peggy said...

Nancy, thanks so much. I bought a new colony of honeybees in May and they seem to be doing well. With trees growing taller and new plantings, the light has changed so much in the garden, not only where it touches but also what it shines through to dapple or color the light. Must remember to allow the sun to just bear down full force in certain areas. Hey I remember that book, in fact I think my mom gave me her copy!

Peggy said...

Michelle, thank you.

Nanette, the blue flowers are larkspur that self-seed everywhere. They also appear in pink, purple and white and I just read they discourage Japanese Beetles which are becoming a problem for us. Glad to have so much larkspur! If you'd like some seed, email me and I'll send you some. :)

Pam, hello and thank you.

Jude, thank you too!

Peggy said...

Kathy, I love knowing you name things and spaces. Agree about spending more time in our gardens....

Cindy, now that you wrote that about the little cloth, I see it too -- thanks for the lovely lively insight. :)

Nanette said...

Thankyou Peggy for letting me know about the larkspurs and the offer of seeds, I would've loved a little of your garden in mine. Sadly they wouldn't be allowed into Australia, we have very strict regulations about plant material coming into the country. But now that I know what they are I'll look for some seeds here and see if I can get them to grow...they are so regal and I love the drift of blue.

DILOU said...

Hello, votre jardin est une merveille de la nature!! tout semble tellement à sa place, c'est un beau lieu de réflexion et de ressource.
Bonjour de Paris

deemallon said...

haven't been by in a while and am refreshed/reminded of the beauty I find here, not just in the lush glory of summer, either. so pretty, your garden. My son in Boulder keeps reporting strings of days in the high 90's. Is this usual?

my garden, though much more pedestrian than yours, has been a shining place of peace this summer.